Entries in Social Networking (290)

Sunday
Apr062014

5 Analytic Tools to Track Your Organization's Metrics

If your organization is struggling to find the right analytic tools to track your website traffic, social media presence, and how your reports, campaigns, or infographics perform across the web, check out this list of 5 helpful analytic tools. It won't fulfill all of your data analysis needs, but if you use some of these tools together, they will provide a decent baseline.

1. Google Analytics Report with Visually

Looking for a report that combines your Google Analytics stats in a visual format? This is a great tool, especially if you need to produce reports weekly and present them to senior leadership. https://create.visual.ly/graphic/google-analytics/

2. Simply Measured

This tool monitors your organization’s social media presence and gives you the ability to produce reports that can be exported to Excel, Powerpoint, and HTML. http://simplymeasured.com/

3. Link Tally

Do you have a big report or infographic that was recently released and are looking to track how much it was shared on social media? Check out Link Tally. Just enter the URL and it will count up how many times it was shared across the social sharing sites: Facebook, Twitter, Google Plus, and LinkedIn. Here's an example of the data Link Tally compiled for an infographic around voter supression my firm Rad Campaign designed and researched for Craig Newmark of craigslist and craigconnects. http://linktally.com/

4. Keyhole

Use this tool to track hashtags and data associated with them such as impressions, which users on Twitter had the most retweets, what domains mentioned the hashtag, etc. In the example below I searched for the hashtag #fundraising. http://keyhole.co/

 5. SocialMention

Looking for an alternative to Google Alerts? Check out SocialMention, which searches the web to identify mentions of a topic, hashtag or person. It also tracks sentiment, but since it’s based on an algorithm rather than an actual real person, take that data with a grain of salt. Case in point. As millions of viewers await the Game of Thrones Season 4 premiere, SocialMention says that the majority of the sentiment is neutral. There is very little positive sentiment. #OhReally http://www.socialmention.com/

 

Tuesday
Mar112014

Best #14NTC Panels and Parties to Check Out

Every year I look forward to one very special conference - the NTC conference organized by the awesome NTEN team. This years 14NTC conference is packed with incredible parties (including an 80s dance party that I'm co-hosting with Salsa), and the Care2 Impact Prize that recognizes individuals in the nonprofit sector who have made an outstanding impact on the field of online advocacy, online fundraising or both. Then there is the fantastic sessions discussing the best tools nonprofits should use to build websites and online campaigns focused on engagement and raising lots of money.

Here's a list of some of my favorite sessions and parties that will be happening during 14NTC. Feel free to leave your favorites in the comments below.

14NTC Sessions  

50 Shades of Social Media: Navigating Policies, Laws, and Ethics
Thursday, March 12th, 10:30 AM

This highly interactive session, will discuss real-world situations, explore using ethical frameworks to resolve social media conundrums, and integrating ethical considerations into your social media policies, training, and practices.

Small Nonprofits, Big Data: Leveraging Data to Optimize Your Digital, Media and Communications Activities
Thursday, March 14, 1:30PM

‘Big data’ has become a catch phrase. But in practical terms, how can small nonprofit organizations harness data and use it effectively? This session will describe sometimes painful, but often rewarding process to do a better job of collecting, analyzing and acting on data, for use in both strategic planning and evaluation.

Disrupting the Nonprofit Sector
Friday, March 13th, 10:30 AM

In the last 10 years, the nonprofit sector has grown more than 60% in the US to an estimated 1.5 million organizations. This translates into thousands of organizations with similar names and missions competing for advocacy, donor, and foundation support. See the problem? If we are going to truly solve the world’s toughest social problems and obtain the necessary resources to do it right, we need to examine how the nonprofit sector can evolve to create more innovative and efficient organizations. This involves disrupting the nonprofit sector as we know it today.

Start at the Start: Using Storyboards, Wireframes, and Mood Boards
Friday, March 13, 1:30PM

If you’re embarking on a website redesign for your nonprofit, this session will be useful as panelists will show you want kind of a creative design you will need to capture your vision and goals for the new website. Expect a lively discussion on how to use storyboards to plan animated functionality, how to use wireframes to create mobile-friendly designs, and how to use mood boards to help determine color, texture, and the overall look and feel of your online communications.

Community Engagement Reinvented: Online Fundraising and Engagement Strategies for the Modern Nonprofit
Saturday, March 15 10:30AM

The way organizations fundraise and engage their supporters has changed, and failure to adapt will have long-term consequences for the success of the mission. This sessions will explore strategies that successful, cutting-edge, organizations are using to engage supporters more powerfully and efficiently than ever before, and generating the revenue today that will sustain their work long into the future.

Shelving Legacy, Sparking Innovation. Building Effective Technology for Philanthropy.
Saturday, March 15th, 10:30AM

This session offers leaders, managers and program officers engaged in philanthropic initiatives a rare chance to hear and discuss building innovation and effective technology into philanthropy with other colleagues, facilitated by a experienced panel from the philanthropy, nonprofit, and technology sectors.

Social Media Superpower: Tapping Creativity to Mobilize your Community
Saturday, March 15 1:30 PM

Do you want to learn how organizations are leveraging their creative superpowers to win on social media? What separates the heroes from the zeroes and how can organizations cultivate their own social media superpowers? This is the session that has the answers to all of your questions.

 

14NTC Parties

NTC Beer: Wednesday, March 12th 7PM to 9PM

Celebrate the 6th annual #ntcbeer, the pre-conference party known for good refreshments and better conversation. Catch up with nptech friends old and new over a few brews or whatever. 

Where: The Black Squirrel, 2427 18th Street NW

 

501 Tech Club Happy Hour, Thursday, March 13 5PM to 7PM

This happy hour is an opportunity for 501 Tech Club organizers—you know who you are—to get together and swap ideas, stories about your local meetups, and jokes.

Where: Marriott Hotel Bar near hotel lobby

80s Dance Party: Friday, Friday, March 14 7PM to 10PM
Remember the days of synthpop, hair metal bands, and leg warmers? Salsa and Rad Campaign are bringing it back for one helluva of an 80's dance party! Join nonprofits and do-gooders for the best 14NTC progressive party. Dance the night away to 80's music by DJ Tea Jay, complimentary food, and drinks. Did we mention fun? How could it not be at a place called Club Heaven and Hell? It’s just a short walk from the NTC conference. Happy Hours and dancing start here!

Where: Heaven and Hell: (2327 18th St, NW)

 

What sessions and parties are you look looking forward to attending?

Wednesday
Feb262014

Is anonymity good or bad for social media?

New startups are launching every day, and it's a lot of work for the nonprofit community to weed through which platforms are useful, and which aren't the right fit. A new social platform, ChronicleMe (CMe) launched recently, and it's a free, anonymous social media platform. The creators of the platform state that "although paradoxical, we believe that anonymous social media will provide millions with deeper connections than ever before. In today‘s current social media platform, we have accepted that everything we post is tracked, scrutinized, and public. Not anymore."

Every post on ChronicleMe is anonymous, but when a user responds to an anonymous post, they'll have the opportunity to reveal their identity, or remain anonymous. If they reveal their identity, the person who posted will have the option to continue the conversation through private messaging.

CMe allows you to link to your Twitter account, and connect with your Facebook friend's CMe accounts, but you won't ever know who's who unless they expose themselves. You have to follow seven people until you'll begin seeing your friends posts to create real anonymity.

The concept of anonymity raises a few questions. What are the consequences of being anonymous, especially for nonprofit constituents? Will this allow for trolls to have more spaces to attack people around hot button issues? And is anything online ever truly anonymous? According to the Pew Research Center's Internet Project,  59% of internet users do not believe it is possible to be completely anonymous online. Anonymity is a potentially dangerous road, and can remove the person from behind the message.

What's interesting is that ChronicleMe has partnerships with two nonprofits: the GLBT National Help Center, which works with gay and lesbian teens, and RAINN, the Rape, Abuse and Incest National Network. When CMe participants suggest that another user gets help, they're sent links to third party help groups. These can be very touchy subjects that are being talked about, and unfortunately trolls and predators thrive on anonymity.

On one hand I can understand why someone would want to be anonymous in discussing these highly sensitive issues, especially if it’s in the form of seeking advice, sharing very personal experiences, etc. However, I can’t shake the flip side of this, which is trolls and predators using platforms like this to hurt people.

What are your thoughts on social platforms that offer anonymity?

Thursday
Feb202014

New Study Shows People Don’t Read Articles, they Retweet

Are you impressed every time a blog post by your organization gets a lot of retweets? How about all those social shares on Huffington Post and Mashable? How many times has your boss come to you and asked “why can’t we get those social share numbers?”  

 A new study by Chartbeat, which measures real-time traffic for some of the biggest websites like Upworthy, said their research shows that many people aren’t reading articles that they retweet.  

Josh Schwartz, Chartbeat’s lead data scientist said that “Facebook shares would reflect the same pattern.”  

Upworthy says they have found that web visitors who consume about 25% of an article are more likely to share it on social media than people who moved onto to something else.  They also found that people who read the entire article are even more likely to share it on social media.

"There is obviously a correlation between number of tweets and total volume of traffic that goes to an article," Schwartz says. "But just not a relationship between stories that are most heavily consumed and stories that are most heavily tweeted."

Over at Buzzfeed they found that social media shares occur by users who have spent 3.5 minutes on a page on a desktop computer, or over 2 minutes on a mobile device.

I’m not surprised by this data. There is just too much information to consume on the web these days so it’s impossible for people to read it all. Plus people tend to skim on the web, especially with the rise of mobile devices.

It’s alarming that so many people are sharing articles with friends, colleagues, and strangers when they barely read the articles. It’s even more disturbing when you factor in that Nielsen’s research shows that 92% of people trust recommendations from friends and family.  

What Should Your Organization Measure?

If social shares and pageviews shouldn’t be your main source of measurement what should you be measuring?

  1. Bounce rates and Time Spent on Website and Posts:  Are people staying on your website and looking at other pages? Or are they immediately bouncing off your website? When you share an article on social media, how long are people staying on that page to read the article, watch the video, etc.?
  2. Commenting: Are people commenting on the articles you share? And if so, which ones? What is the sentiment? Is it positive, neutral, or negative?
  3. Most Popular Articles Across Channels: What articles generated the most comments and traffic on your website and social media?
Thursday
Feb062014

Best Studies On How To Get More ReTweets

It’s hard to believe that seven years after Twitter launched, organizations are still vying for any information they can find on how to get the most ReTweets out of a platform that was meant for social conversations. One of the best places to go for Twitter data is Dan Zarrella at Hubspot. Dan has spent the last few years studying millions of Tweets and what resonates with people on Twitter. So if you are looking to amplify your advocacy efforts on Twitter, check out some of Dan’s most important data. However, it’s important to note that integrating some of these strategies will only take you so far. If you don’t have compelling content but your tweets are the recommended 100 characters, you still won’t get very far with this channel.

Recommended Tweet Length to Generate ReTweets

Tweets between 100 and 115 characters were 34% more likely to be ReTweeted than Tweets outside of this range.

Hashtag Effects on ReTweets

Tweets that contain one or more hashtags were 55% more likely to be RT’d than Tweets that did not use hashtags. Note: Please don’t fill your tweet up with 7 hashtags. That will not get RT’d.

Images Impact on ReTweets

Tweets contained images using Twitter’s native tool pic.Twitter.com were almost 2x as likely to be retweeted while the use of Twitpic increased the odds by over 60%. However, tweets that used Facebook or Instagram links were less likely to be RT’d so don’t use these tools for Twitter.

Social Calls to Action Work

When you ask people do the following on Twitter, many will do it.

  • Please Help
  • Please ReTweet
  • Please RT

“Visit” did not resonate with people so remove that from your Twitter vocabulary.

In addition, I recommend using these social calls to action sparingly. If your audiences constantly see tweets that ask for help or to please RT your message, they will tune you out. Focus on engagement such as answering people’s questions about your issue and ask them questions. Put yourself in their shoes. Do you like when people or organizations always ask you to do stuff on social media? Or do you prefer that people have a real conversation with you?

Exclamation Points Get More RT’s

While exclamation points in tweets may get more RT’s they don’t get more clicks.  

Monday
Jan272014

Upworthy Type Headlines: To Like or Dislike?

Upworthy, a site that focuses on curating social cause related videos and content has been receiving a lot of media attention for changing how bloggers write headlines. In November of 2013 Upworthy traffic grew to about 87M unique visits, which was quite a drastic leap from less than 5 million a year ago, according to Quantcast. In December traffic dipped about 21% to 68M unique visits. These numbers are still quite respectable. But is this a signal that people are growing weary of the “and you won’t believe what happened next” headlines? And what does this trend mean for nonprofits?

Please do not run out and start using Upworthy like subject lines on your online advocacy and fundraising appeals. Just because this tactic works for Upworthy (who is driven by a ton of testing on their own website) does not mean it will work for your organization. Remember, you are not a viral news sharing startup. Just like you were never the Obama campaign when their fundraising tactics were all of the rage. Raise your hand if you adapted those tactics a few years ago and suddenly raised an extra few million dollars. Any takers?

However, trying to amp up your creativity with headlines and testing them to see if they resonate with your audiences is something you should always be investing resources into. And that is one of the key take-ways from Upworthy’s success. The startup is constantly experimenting and testing to see what headlines and messaging works best with their target audiences. And if you look at their website right now, you will find that some of their headlines are simpler and not the hyped up "and you won't believe what happened next."

What about Facebook?

Upworthy is a great example of how compelling content can generate a lot of shares and comments on Facebook too. Should your organization adopt a similar model and share popular memes and videos with your audience on Facebook to generate more engagement? You bet so as long as there is some connection to the issues you are working on. However, memes and videos should not be your only source of content. Drew Bernard over at ActionSprout likes to compare this content strategy to broccoli and cheese. You need to balance just the right amount of cheese (fun stuff) and broccoli (your engaging messaging and content) to get the perfect dish that everyone loves.

Has your organization tested Upworthy like subject lines or headlines? What have the results been?

PS: Be sure and check out this fun Chrome plugin called Downworthy. It changes viral headlines like ""Will Blow Your Mind" to "Might Perhaps Mildly Entertain You For a Moment". #SoAwesome

Monday
Jan202014

Social Media Stats You Need To Know

It's the end of January and that means organizations social media and marketing plans for 2014 are off to a running start. As you begin to execute your campaigns, take a look at these social media stats from 2013. The stats are impressive. For example, did you know that there are 250 billion photos posted on Facebook daily? Or that 28% of RT's on Twitter are due to the inclusion of "Please RT". Side note: please don't use this tactic in every tweet you send out, or else people will start to ignore you. Save it for the VIP tweets.