Entries in Nonprofit Benchmark Studies (30)

Friday
Feb072014

Charitable Giving Report Shows Online Donations Increased by 13.5%

This just in! The latest 2013 Charitable Giving Report by Blackbaud analyzed data from more than 4,000 nonprofits to provide the largest analysis in online giving data. According to the report, overall giving grew 4.9% in 2013 compared to 2012.

Even more impressive than overall giving is the 13.5% increase in online giving. Online giving accounted for 6.4% of all charitable giving in 2013. Large organizations fared better from overall giving while small orgs benefitted the most from online giving.

Speaking of online giving, #GivingTuesday made huge strides last year. Online giving on #GivingTuesday in 2013 was up 90%, compared to 2012. The average online gift on Tuesday, December 3, was $142.05, a $40.45 increase from 2012.

Which Sectors are Raising the Most?

"This is the second consecutive year that online giving has experienced double-digit growth rates. Six of the nine sectors in the analysis had year-over-year growth over 10%, with faith-based organizations having the largest increase." International affairs organizations had the greatest increase in overall charitable giving in 2013 (13.2%).


Which Months See the Most Overall Giving?

You may not be surprised to find out that the most overall giving occurs during the last three months of the year. Those are the months that organizations push their year-end giving, host challenges, and release their annual reports. More than one-third of all giving done in 2013 was done between October, November, and December. Both overall giving and online giving reached its absolute highest in December.

The slowest month for overall giving was February, bringing in just 5.8% of 2013's overall gifts. Perhaps the Hallmark Holiday is sucking people in, and they're spending too much on chocolates and candies.

The slowest month for online giving was January, the first month of 2013, the good news is that there was an incline throughout the rest of the year.

What trends did your nonprofit notice in 2013? Did you receive more online donations than you have in previous years?

Sunday
Nov172013

Infographic: How Foundations Use Social Media

While the majority of nonprofit organizations have a social media presence, only 45% of foundations use social media. The Foundation Center surveyed over 1,000 foundations across the U.S. to dig deeper into what’s trending with foundations and social media. My firm Rad Campaign had an opportunity to dig into the survey data and team up with the Foundation Center to produce an infographic that reveals some interesting trends. Check out the highlights below.

Which Types Of Foundations Are Using Social Media?

  • 88% of community foundations
  • 55% of corporate foundations
  • 34% of family and independent foundations

What Social Media Channels Are Foundations Using?

Foundations that use social media prefer these channels:

  • 65% use Facebook
  • 40% use Twitter
  • 32% use YouTube

71% of Foundations Have No Formal Social Media Strategy

Yes, you read that right – very few foundations have actually taken the time to develop a formal social media strategy. I found this statistic quite surprising and alarming because foundations are increasingly requiring grantees to use social media to raise awareness about their nonprofit organization and foster community. But how can foundations properly evaluate nonprofit’s social media usage, if the majority of foundations aren’t using social media themselves or don’t have a formal social media strategy?

Majority of Foundations Using Social Media Say It’s Useful

On a more positive note, 61% of the foundations using social media said that it’s been very useful or somewhat useful in furthering their work.  And 74% said that social media is useful in furthering philanthropy.

The infographic also highlights foundations that are using social media effectively, such as the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the Woods Charitable Fund.  Be sure and also check out the social media staffing survey data.

You can view the full infographic below or on Glasspockets.org.

 

Saturday
Sep212013

A Look At Canadian Philanthropy Across Generations

Last week Blackbaud along with partners HJC, Sea Change Strategies, and Edge Research released findings from the 2013 Next Generation of Canadian Giving study.

The study looked at the following: 

  • What are the preferred giving channels for Generation Y (18-32); Generation X (33-48); Baby Boomers (49-67); and Civics (68+) ?
  • What are the preferred communications and engagement channels?
  • What kinds of charities do people support?

Eight Key Findings:

1. The majority of Canadians donate money to charity. Civics are the most generous generation. About 9 in 10 of Civics give, and they support a variety of causes than younger generations. However, it’s worth noting the this generation is dwindling and their income  is holding steady.


2. Baby Boomers will have great influence on charitable giving for the foreseeable future, but Generation X is quickly catching up. This is the generation to watch and cultivate now.

3. Most donors across all age groups do not plan to expand their giving in the coming year. This is not surprising given that many people across generations are still feeling the impact of a struggling economy.

4. While multichannel communications has become standard these days, your organizations needs to find the right mix when you target different generations. For example, direct mail is not dead. Generations Y and X prefer to give online, and as many Baby Boomers say they give online as via direct mail.

5. Generation Y donors have distinct priorities and preferences with regard to causes they support.  They demand accountability and transparency than older donors.

6. Among transaction channels, the future of telemarketing and giving by SMS/text does not look so great in Canada, but face-to-face and street funding is surprisingly strong.

7. Peer-to-peer fundraising and crowdfunding appear to have promising futures as fundraising strategies for younger generations. Though you should note that this takes a lot of staff resources, planning, and time to raise significant money.

8. Nearly half of those who give engage with causes in ways other than making donations. Embrace it!

 

Now that you have seen the statistics around Canadian giving, how will you use this data? The report suggested that you think about the following questions:

1. Have you underinvested in fundraising to Gen X donors, who are a quickly rising force in philanthropic giving in Canada?

2. Have you completely ignored the up and coming younger generations, or relegated them to an un-strategic social media effort?

3. Does your fundraising channel mix include direct mail for younger donors and digital communications for older ones? 

Friday
May242013

Nonprofit Benchmark Study Shows Nonprofits Are Raising More Money

Last month we reported that online fundraising response rates declined 27% between 2011-2012, according to the eNonprofit Benchmark study. The latest Blackbaud Online Marketing Benchmark Study for Nonprofits that analyzed data from 500 organizations using the Luminate platform also indicated a steep decline in fundraising response rates. According to the report, response rates on appeals declined by more than 18%. “Declining response rates illustrate a saturated channel with undifferentiated messaging and campaigns, said the report. “This is present in direct mail, telemarketing, and face-to-face solicitation.”

The average online gift was $89.

While open rates were 14.72% (slightly up from the previous year), the average click rate on online fundraising appeals were .7%


Online Revenue and Advocacy Growth

On a more positive note, median online revenue grew by 11.6%. Online fundraising was driven primarily by recurring donors and repeat donors, which grew 27 percent and 20 percent, respectively. First time gifts grew 3%.

Advocacy saw an 8.7% increase in actions taken and 11.9% of advocates that also made a donation online. It’s worth noting that Jewish organizations experienced an increase of advocates by 23.6%, and environment and wildlife had an increase of 22.46%. This illustrates that that if cultivated properly advocates can also be converted to donors.

Click to read more ...

Thursday
Apr112013

Are Twitter and Facebook Playing Tug-O-War?

A few days ago, I reported some of the juicy details from the 2013 eNonprofit Benchmarks Study that was just released showing data from 2012. There were 55 of the country’s leading nonprofits surveyed for this study, including the American Red Cross, Oceana, American Heart Association, AARP, and Human Rights Watch.

In my last blog post, I talked about the decline of email and fundraising response rates. Today I'm digging into the the social media and mobile portions of the study.

As social media continues to grow and develop, nonprofit organizations continue to attract more Fans and Followers—Twitter Followers in particular have increased at a remarkable rate, with a whopping 264% growth over the past year. 

Despite this growth, email lists continue to dominate in size (no real surprise here), and Facebook remains the larger social media presence for most groups. For every 1,000 email subscribers, groups in the Benchmarks Study have 149 Facebook Fans, 53 Twitter Followers, and 29 Mobile Subscribers.

Facebook:

  • You may be wondering, how often do other organizations post on Facebook? On average they're posting about once per day, though large groups posted twice as frequently.
  • Users were more than twice as likely to like, share, or comment on a Photo post than any other content.  

Click to read more ...

Tuesday
Apr092013

Are Email and Fundraising Response Rates in a State of Decline?

The 2012 eNonprofit Behnchmarks Study was just released and it's packed with all sorts of juicy email, advocacy, and fundraising data from 55 nonprofits ranging from environmental organizations to human rights organizations.

Check out the data I pulled from the report that I think it worth comparing to your own organizations benchmarks.

The good news is that online revenue is up and monthly giving programs have grown 43%. Email list sizes are continuing to grow at about 15%. Overall, nonprofits are reaching new supporters more than ever across online channels.

 

Now the bad news. Email response rates are down, particularly around fundraising messaging. Are nonprofits falling into the trap of treating their supporters like ATM machines? Are they not focusing on nurturing relationships with supporters and engaging them in meaningful ways? You would not believe what my email inbox looks like these days from nonprofit organizations. “Give me money” – seems to be the central theme. This is problematic because it causes list burn out and people begin to tune out and not respond to emails when you really need them.

Online Fundraising

  • Increased by 21% in 2012.

Click to read more ...

Monday
Jul162012

11 Outstanding Nonprofit Reports You Should Read

There are a ton of smart people writing about nonprofit technology and communications to help nonprofit communicators keep up on the latest online trends and developments. When you need to take a really deep dive into critical topics, but don’t want to rely on your own trial and error it helps to look beyond blogs and social media. Thankfully, you can take advantage of great in-depth research and findings published in nonprofit reports.

Here 11 nonprofit reports that are worth a look when you want to brush up on everything from nonprofit social media adoption, staffing, fundraising, and online engagement best practices.

1) The Nonprofit Social Media Policy Workbook – Sometimes “don’t be stupid” is good enough as an informal policy to guide an organization’s social media engagement. However, many organizations look to create an official policy to satisfy legal concerns, make senior leadership more comfortable, and to provide more in depth guidelines to staff who engage supporters and the public on social channels. This great workbook from Idealware and Darim Online provides insightful questions, exercises, and a sample policy template that community managers can use as a starting point in creating an organization’s official social media policy. Debra Askanase has a great review of the workbook that I’d recommend you check out as well. The Nonprofit Social Media Decision Guide, also from Idealware, is a good complimentary resource.

 

2) 2011 Nonprofit Technology Staffing & Investments Survey Report – If you are planning guidelines for your organization’s use of social media you will also want to take a close look at your organization’s technology staffing and capacity. This report from NTEN by Annaliese Hoehling, shares the findings of a staffing survey that received nearly a thousand responses from nonprofit professionals. Organizations have an average 3.5 technology staff and the average ratio of tech staff to organizational staff is 1 tech staff to about 60 organizational staff. Check out the full report to see how your staffing stacks up with that of other organizations of similar size and tech adoption level.

 

 

3) A Consumers Guide to Low Cost Donor Management Systems – If you are still managing your donor database with Excel spreadsheets it’s time for a better solution. Idealware’s report explores the essential features of nonprofit CRMs and donor management systems and makes recommendations based on specific needs. The guide includes a comparison of 29 different systems and offers detailed reviews of 10 of the most popular. Here’s your first stop if your starting from square one to select a nonprofit CRM.

Click to read more ...